Sunday Serendipity

Here is the Youtube algo’s offering for this morning, note the social distancing of the audience in the back ground.

Enjoy, Jack

From wiki

“The Piano Concerto No. 2 in F minor, Op. 21, is a piano concerto composed by Frédéric Chopin in 1829. Chopin wrote the piece before he had finished his formal education, at around 20 years of age. It was first performed on 17 March 1830, in Warsaw, Poland, with the composer as soloist. It was the second of his piano concertos to be published (after the Piano Concerto No. 1), and so was designated as “No. 2″, even though it was written first.”

From wiki Anna Borysivna Fedorova (Ukrainian: А́нна Бори́сівна Фе́дорова; born February 27, 1990) is a Ukrainian concert pianist. Fedorova performs as soloist, chamber musician and with symphony orchestras in the major concert halls of the Netherlands, Germany, France, Italy, UK, Ukraine, Poland, the US, Mexico, Argentina,

Nordwestdeutsche Philharmonie

Sunday Serendipity

Twitter isn’t a total wasteland of bickering tweets and Russian bots. Todays selection appeared in my twitter feed Friday. with the comment that “you don’t have to be Jewish to enjoy this”

From the video

“Taken from “Compassion” – a song cycle for voice and orchestra written by Lior and Nigel Westlake. Performed by Lior and the SSO at the Sydney Opera House Sep, 2013. Conducted by Nigel Westlake.”

From wiki

Avinu Malkeinu “Our Father, Our King”) is a Jewish prayer recited during Jewish services on Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur,

I will leave any other comments to someone more qualified than I am, except to say it is beautiful music

Enjoy, Jack

Sunday Serendipity, more Jazz

Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis

This is another concert of a series that is a mix of very good Jazz interspaced with educational commentary by Wynton. To learn more about about Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra here is their web site

Enjoy, Jack

The Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis perform the music of four pioneering giants of jazz—Duke Ellington, Dizzy Gillespie, John Coltrane, and Charles Mingus—in Duke, Dizzy, ‘Trane & Mingus: Jazz Titans. Duke, Dizzy, ‘Trane, and Mingus singularly pursued ancestral music, particularly from Africa and Latin America, and used their discoveries to broaden the horizons of their artistry and create new terrain for jazz. In this concert, the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis play selections from Ellington’s Latin American Suite and Virgin Islands Suite; Coltrane’s Olé Coltrane and Africa Brass; Mingus’ Tijuana Moods; and various pieces from Gillespie’s early Afro-Cuban era through his later work with the United Nations band, showing his evolution from Afro-Cuban to a more expansive Afro-Latin idiom. The JLCO illuminates the historically important rhythmic distinctions, chant-based melodies, and modal soundscapes created as a result of these albums that forever changed the conception of the boundaries of jazz.